Philip Rizk

Standing with Syrians: An open letter to an anti-imperialist

Standing with Syrians: An open letter to an anti-imperialist

tabulagaza (Philip Rizk) Feb 24 2017 14:05 libcom.org Eva is a real person who I have known since 2007, as described in this article. But in this text Eva also stands for many other people, whether outspoken or silent supporters of the Syrian regime and its allies. I will not re-post her photo here. In a world flooded with images, it is important to maintain our ability to imagine a moment.
Solidarity, Translation and the Politics of the Margin

Solidarity, Translation and the Politics of the Margin

Philip Rizk, interviewed by Mona Baker Editor’s Introduction: I chose to interview Philip Rizk for this collection because I consider him one of the most critical and articulate voices to emerge out of the vigour and ensuing trauma of the past few years in Egypt. He is as un-institutionalized as almost anyone can be in a modern society, and perhaps it is his positioning outside most mainstream institutions, including academia, that gives him a unique vantage point, one that allows him to do more justice to the complexity and passion of the revolutionary landscape in Egypt than most.
Freed Egyptian Protester Describes Ordeal, but Fate of Seized Blogger Is Unknown

Freed Egyptian Protester Describes Ordeal, but Fate of Seized Blogger Is Unknown

Philip Rizk, a blogger and peace activist, was released days after being detained by Egyptian security forces after his participation in a march to raise awareness about conditions in Gaza. Christina Rizk By MICHAEL SLACKMAN FEB. 11, 2009, The New York Times CAIRO — For more than four straight days, Philip Rizk said, he was blindfolded, handcuffed and interrogated around the clock by Egyptian state security agents who abducted him on Friday after he took part in a march in support of Gaza.
Freed Egyptian Protester Describes Ordeal, but Fate of Seized Blogger Is Unknown

Freed Egyptian Protester Describes Ordeal, but Fate of Seized Blogger Is Unknown

Philip Rizk, a blogger and peace activist, was released days after being detained by Egyptian security forces after his participation in a march to raise awareness about conditions in Gaza. Christina Rizk By MICHAEL SLACKMAN FEB. 11, 2009, The New York Times CAIRO — For more than four straight days, Philip Rizk said, he was blindfolded, handcuffed and interrogated around the clock by Egyptian state security agents who abducted him on Friday after he took part in a march in support of Gaza.
Interview with Philip Rizk by Shuruq Harb

Interview with Philip Rizk by Shuruq Harb

Why Riot?, video by Mosireen Video Collect, 2013. “The revolution is not a thing of the past, the revolution is still in process.” Philip Rizk stated as we began our discussion of his text “2011 is not 1968”, whereby he challenges the dominant narratives of the January 25th Revolution as a youth lead revolution. He argues that the radicalizing factor of the uprising was an underclass without leaders.
Interview with Philip Rizk by Shuruq Harb

Interview with Philip Rizk by Shuruq Harb

Why Riot?, video by Mosireen Video Collect, 2013. “The revolution is not a thing of the past, the revolution is still in process.” Philip Rizk stated as we began our discussion of his text “2011 is not 1968”, whereby he challenges the dominant narratives of the January 25th Revolution as a youth lead revolution. He argues that the radicalizing factor of the uprising was an underclass without leaders.
2011 is not 1968: An open letter to an onlooker on the Day of Rage

2011 is not 1968: An open letter to an onlooker on the Day of Rage

by Philip Rizk Tuesday, January 28, 2014 - 17:42 Editor’s note: If the Palestinian struggle has taught us one thing, it is not to forget, to remember, to retell our stories of resistance over and over again. And it might be that Egypt’s revolutionary voices have hit a point, where remembering, revising and retelling is at the epicenter of their resistance. In this spirit, we asked Philip Rizk to use this space to retell his story of the revolution, as he wrote it in 2012.
2011 is not 1968: An open letter to an onlooker on the Day of Rage

2011 is not 1968: An open letter to an onlooker on the Day of Rage

by Philip Rizk Tuesday, January 28, 2014 - 17:42 Editor’s note: If the Palestinian struggle has taught us one thing, it is not to forget, to remember, to retell our stories of resistance over and over again. And it might be that Egypt’s revolutionary voices have hit a point, where remembering, revising and retelling is at the epicenter of their resistance. In this spirit, we asked Philip Rizk to use this space to retell his story of the revolution, as he wrote it in 2012.
On August 14, a belated obituary for Bassem Mohsen

On August 14, a belated obituary for Bassem Mohsen

Philip Rizk Thursday, August 14, 2014 - 18:33 I met Bassem Mohsen for a few moments in July 2013. He was upbeat and hopeful that the army had taken hold of power from the Muslim Brotherhood. I remember being surprised by his quick optimism. He believed that these generals were different than those who had ruled during the period of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, following former President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster.
On August 14, a belated obituary for Bassem Mohsen

On August 14, a belated obituary for Bassem Mohsen

Philip Rizk Thursday, August 14, 2014 - 18:33 I met Bassem Mohsen for a few moments in July 2013. He was upbeat and hopeful that the army had taken hold of power from the Muslim Brotherhood. I remember being surprised by his quick optimism. He believed that these generals were different than those who had ruled during the period of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, following former President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster.